Posts Tagged ‘Bad Profits’

One of the basic concepts of Net Promoter Score® is the idea of Good Profits and Bad Profits. Here’s a quick description :

Bad Profits

Customer feels misled, mistreated, ignored, or coerced.

They may actually dissuade new customers from using the product or service.

Good Profits

Customer feels appreciated and have been treated fairly, or the product exceeds their expectations.

They repurchase and tell their friends, family and colleagues.

Unfortunately, many companies opt for the short term benefits of Bad Profits. If you’ve ever been stuck in a 3 year wireless contract with a company you hate then you know what Bad Profits  are. Personally, I’m doing battle with my auto insurance company who, after  a 41 year relationship, treats me with less respect than they would a new customer. But more about that later.

On the other hand there are companies who really understand Good Profits and are willing to invest profits in order to develop a positive long-term customer relationship – one that results in a loyal customer who recommends. Here are two brief stories about my own recent experiences with Good Profit companies:

Story #1 –New Balance Shoe Store (Bayview Mall, Toronto)

I have fussy feet so I am very fussy about my shoes. The staff in this store really understands shoes and what it means to have a good pair that fit well. I recently purchased a premium priced pair of casual shoes at the store. After wearing them about 5 or 6 times, the leather stretched and the shoes did not fit as well as they did when they were new. On a whim, I took them back to the store with the hope that I might be able to return them and negotiate a discount on a new pair. I knew that I was going back after their “no-hassle” return period, but I figured that I had nothing to lose by trying. I was expecting to meet some resistance from the store staff and I was prepared to haggle on the price of a pair of new shoes. To make a long story short, I was extremely pleased when the store manager, David, offer me a full exchange for a new pair. All I had to pay was the price difference between the two pairs of shoes. He did not have to do this, but he took it upon himself to exchange the shoes for me. What did it cost him? The price of a pair of shoes, $150. What did he get in return? A loyal customer who has freely recommended the store to friends, family and co-workers.  Is a loyal customer worth $150?

Story #2 – Porter Airlines, Toronto

Porter Airlines is a small carrier that flies out of Toronto’s downtown airport. They have gained a well-deserved reputation for customer service excellence and they did not disappoint me.  Last month, I booked two return tickets to New York. The very next day I saw an ad for Porter Airlines offering a 30% discount on flights to New York. I immediately contacted Porter and spoke to one of the agents. I said I saw the ad and asked if I could get a price adjustment on my tickets since I had booked them just the day before. I was prepared for a fight on this one, but after confirming my booking, the agent cheerfully gave me a credit for the difference that could be used on a future flight. I was pleasantly surprised at the ease of which I got the credit/refund. No hassle and no arguments. They seem to appreciate my business and wanted me as a customer. Again, what did it cost them? Less than $130. What did they gain? A loyal customer who recommends and that’s worth much more than $130.

In both cases, companies that focused on short term profits would have tried to push me aside. New Balance would have been correct to say that the return period had expired. Porter could have easily held firm on the price I originally paid for the tickets. But, in both cases, the company representatives were well trained and were empowered to handle the situation. These companies understand the value of investing in the customer experience to create a loyal customer. It would be very interesting to see the Net Promoter Score® for these two companies. I suspect their NPS® is very high.

Now, if I could only get my insurance company to see the light.

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