Posts Tagged ‘SatMetrix’

What if you threw a party and nobody came?

What if you implemented a Net Promoter Score™ program and nobody bought into it?

What if you had a simple process to get your employees engaged in an NPS® program and keep them engaged?

Over the past year, I’ve trained a lot of company employees on Net Promoter Score, the Closed-loop concept and related applications. The employees were “assigned” to take the training with the intent that all employees would gain a basic understanding of the importance of NPS.

When facing these employees in a classroom setting, my first challenge was to address the “WIIFM” attitude – commonly known as “What’s in it for me?” The other issue was often “What’s this got to do with my department? We don’t work directly with customers.” It’s easy for senior executives at the top of the company pyramid to understand the big picture, the long-term horizon and how NPS can drive profit and growth. But is difficult when you’re at the bottom looking up to understand how you fit into the bigger picture.

And who can blame employees for being skeptical of yet another new training initiative? These could be the same employees who have lived through TQC, ISO 9001, 6 Sigma, Search for Excellence, One-to-One Marketing, Emotional Intelligence and Good to Great. Past experience drives future expectations.

So, how do you get the employees interested, engaged and committed? Here is a simple six step process that I’ve developed to ease the pain of implementing a NPS program.

1.Recruit

Employees need to be actively recruited to the NPS program using the same marketing and promotion skills that would be used to acquire new customers. Identify the short and long term benefit of an NPS program and how it may impact their career, future and financial situation. Make it desirable.

2.Re-fit

The basic NPS concept is purposely designed as a “one size fits all”. However, it needs to be tailored specifically to fit the employees and their roles and responsibilities. You must show each employee and each department how they impact the customer experience. Make it personal.

3.Re-word

Every company and department has a unique lexicon that is almost like a secret code. Re-word and re-phrase the NPS program so that is can be easily understood by everyone in the organization. Put it into words and terms that are commonly used around the office and on the factory floor. Make it relevant.

4.Re-set

If you already have a list of employee performance metrics (and who doesn’t) review and reset them to reflect the objectives and outcomes of the NPS program. NPS performance metrics should focus on desired employee behaviours, so watch out for conflicts and contradictions in metrics. Don’t be afraid of tossing out the old, beloved metrics of days gone by. If they didn’t work then, they’re not going to work now. Make it real.

5.Reward

Implementing change is hard work and often a risky venture. If the risk of change exceeds the reward, employees may not want to take the plunge. Implementing an NPS program requires a commitment to change in the organization and culture. Recognize those employees with the fortitude to drive change and challenge the status quo. Reward them for their efforts and sing their praises when they are successful. Make it all worthwhile.

6.Reinforce

A two hour training session does not create an expert. A training manual does not result in commitment. Posters don’t drive change; engaged employees drive change. The tenets of NPS require constant nurturing and reinforcing through communications, review, examples, team meetings, celebrations and demonstrations of corporate commitment. NPS is a way of doing business, not a way of keeping score. Make it part of the company culture.

Implementing a Net Promoter Score program within your company can result in a tidal wave of change throughout the organization. But, that tidal wave of change starts out as a ripple of understanding and commitment from each and every employee.

You need all your employees to come to the party.

Keith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

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Although the Net Promoter Score® process is a simple and effective way to measure and track customer loyalty, we should not fall into the trap of oversimplifying the drivers of loyalty. For every product or service there is a series of steps, interactions, and opportunities to create or destroy customer loyalty. Each of these steps or interactions can make or break the health of the customer relationship. Fred Reichheld, in his book The Ultimate Question, refers to this linear series of steps or interactions as the Customer Corridor. Just like in any journey, one misstep can have a disastrous impact on loyalty. Let me explain by relating my own, recent experience.

I finally made the plunge and purchased a large, flat screen HD TV. But what is an HD TV without the digital HD signal? That’s when I began my journey down the Customer Corridor of my local cable provider. I’ll not name the provider directly, so I’ll give them a pseudonym. I’ll call them Dodgers to protect myself from any possible legal action.

As a long time customer of Dodgers wireless and cable services, I often receive their marketing materials regarding their Hi Def cable service. As the first step on the Customer Corridor, the materials made a favorable impression. In fact, when my son purchased his HD TV, I recommended Dodgers to him. So, it was not surprising that I chose Dodgers as my supplier of the HD digital signal.

It was all down hill from that point.

With my new shiny HD TV set up and hungry for a Hi Def signal, I set out on the next step in the Customer Corridor and scampered off to my closest Dodgers retail outlet to pick up a rental HD Digital cable box. “Sorry,” they told me at that store, “Our systems are down and you’ll have to go to the Dodgers Plus store if you want to rent the cable box.” Slightly miffed, but still anxious to obtain my own HD TV experience, I set out on the next step of the Corridor and plodded off to the Dodgers Plus store.

After a twenty minute drive, I finally found the store and bounded in with all the energy of a playful puppy. Things were looking up as I spotted the in-store kiosk which I assumed was the spot to register for HD TV service. After waiting 10 minutes without being served, a Dodgers employee casually enlightened me to the fact that I was waiting in the wrong area, and had to proceed to the next Corridor step, the waiting line. I was now the sixth, non-smiling person in the line. This step in the Customer Corridor was not moving very far, very fast.

With all the patient of a three-year-old with a full bladder, I finally reached the front of the line and asked Rosie how to sign up for HD service. Maybe it was just me sliding into a foul mood, but Rosie seemed to rattle off the requirements for HD TV in mere milliseconds. I could only hope that my new TV had a refresh rate as fast as Rosie’s sales pitch. I nodded something akin to acceptance which prompted Rosie to hustle off to the pack room. She quickly (good for her sake) returned with a bag full of electronic gear. She thrust the bag toward me and told me this was all I needed and the instructions where in the bag. I asked if the service was “plug and play” and if I needed to do anything else to get the service started. “Nope,” she replied “I’ve initiated the service from here. Next customer please.” So, with bag in hand, and very little information in my brain, I headed home to the next step in the Corridor.

I returned home with heightened expectations. Now I had the HD signal within my grasp. Of course, you can guess how the next Corridor step unfolded. I plugged in all the cords, deciphered the instruction manual as best I could, turned on all the buttons and waited for the Glorious High Definition Picture! Actually, I repeated this step fours times before I reluctantly made the “I’m so stupid, I can’t get this #%$!&* thing to work” call the Dodgers customer service.

The Dodgers IVR assured me that they valued my business and the wait in the customer service queue would not be too long. I doggedly held on, listening to the marketing pitches, so I would not lose my place in the queue. I spent my time scanning the manual to see if I had missed a step. I was about to take the back off the cable box with my teeth when the Dodgers customer care agent clicked in. After the normal interrogation about my name, number, birth date and shoe size, I was allowed to explain my situation. With a condescending tone, the agent advised me that the cable box needed to be initiated to get the signal (despite Rosie’s claim it was ready to go). When this didn’t work, we tried twice more before the agent decided that the problem needed to be punted over the wall to Technical Services. On to the next step in the Corridor.

The technical service agent interrogated me about my name, number, birth date and shoe size, and then I was allowed to explain my situation. His attempts to get the signal to my TV were futile and he decided that I needed a visit from an in-home service technician. I have to admit that I lost my cool when he told me it would be at least five days before someone could come to the house to resolve my issue. “Not good enough”, I exclaimed “I want it and I want it now”. He seemed genuinely taken aback by my response. His only other remedy was to return the cable box and exchange it for another. He was guessing the box might be at fault. His suggestion got me off the line and out of the house.

So back I went to the Dodgers store. To be honest, the store staff was very efficient in replacing the cable box. Very few questions asked. I could only surmise they had done this before, many times before.

Would it be a surprise to say that Cable Box #2 didn’t resolve the issue? Didn’t think so. Back to customer care, back to the interrogation and onward to Technical Service. However, this time, I was told that a technician could be at my house the very next day to fix my problems. Since it was now dinner time, and I had already lost a day of Hi Def viewing, I jumped at the offer and booked the service tech for 11:00 am to 2:00 pm the next day. So began the next steps in this journey.

The service technician arrived the next day at 12:30 pm, well within the scheduled arrival window. A good start and hopefully a sign of things to come, I thought. Wrong again.

After checking the outside cable, which was nearly 30 years old, he determined that the cable could not carry the digital signal. This would have been really good to know when I initially picked up the cable box. I cannot be the only one in the city in this situation.

The tech then proceeded to pull a new cable from the underground cable vault, across my neighbor’s driveway, up a lamppost, through two trees, around my downspout, around my house, through a new hole in the wall and, finally, to my new virginal HD TV. Voila! I had HD TV! But, it was too soon to get excited.

After some checking, the tech determined that cable box #2 did not show an IP address. It seems this is needed if I ever wanted to order Dodgers- On- Demand. So, back down the Corridor and back to the store I went for a third cable box.

I’ll give the store staff full credit. They did not run and hide when I entered the store, perhaps because I was on a first name basis with most of them. The young fellow who had serviced me the previous day greeted me with “What; you again?” Sympathetic to my plight, he found me a brand new cable box (based on the manufactured date) and assured me that the cable box would not be the cause of any further problems.

He was right. Cable box #3 delivered the picture I have been dreaming of and it had an IP address. It was time to relax with a mildly alcoholic beverage of my choice and enjoy the HD shows. Or, at least until my neighbor started banging on my door.

It seems that the service technician, in his haste, had left the new cable draped across my neighbour’s driveway. She was very concerned, and quite rightly so, that the exposed cable would be a dangerous tripping hazard. I was concerned that the cable might get broken or cut and then I would lose my coveted signal. I had to act fast.

Back I went to customer care, who sent me to technical services who sent me to facilities scheduling. Yes, they agreed the cable represented a danger and they would send someone out to fix the problem. They gave me a case number to refer to but no specific time when the cable would be secured. My neighour also called Dodgers to complain. I guess she did not have my tact for handling these types of situations. She was told that if she didn’t like the way it was being handled she could call the president of Dodgers directly. She has yet to make that call but the conversation is being shared with most of the neighborhood.

Several days passed and there was no sign of a Dodgers technician willing to secure the cable. My neighbor was getting testy so I grabbed my box of tools and spent 30 minutes of my own time to secure the cable. This calmed down my neighbor and made sure that my HD signal would not leave me any time soon. I wonder how I can bill Dodgers for my time.

As I mentioned at the onset, the Customer Corridor offers many steps to impact the customer experience, leading to a likelihood of recommending. In my case, I would recommend Dodgers based on their marketing materials, a certain retail staff member and the final HD TV picture. I would definitely not recommend Dodgers based on the ability of customer care and technical services to resolve an issue over the phone. I would recommend Dodgers based on the in-home technician’s ability to identify the cause of my problem, but would definitely not recommend based on the sloppy work of the same technician.

Overall, the combined steps along the Corridor resulted in a Detractor not a Promoter. Analyzing the Customer Corridor will highlight what your company does well, but will also point out the specific interactions or transactions that may have a negative impact on the customer experience.

Loyalty is not the result of a single experience, but the accumulated impact of many steps in the walk along the Customer Corridor.

Are there any bumps or potholes along your company’s Customer Corridor? Take a walk and find out.

Keith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

If you read my earlier blogs, you’ll know that I have been a devoted and loyal Toyota owner since 1976. In the past, I’ve recommended Toyotas to anyone within hearing distance. The cars have been dependable, reliable and, in spite of ongoing price creep, a good value in cars.

But now what do I do? With all the recalls for Toyota products, do I continue to recommend freely, or do I qualify my recommendation? Would anybody even believe my recommendation? Have I suddenly become a Passive?

To make matters worse, the lease on my 2006 Camry ends in April 2010. I’ve been shopping the Toyota dealerships looking for a replacement, but every model I considered has been recalled. I even test drove the Prius hybrid and was seriously considering leasing the new 2010 model. Then, surprise surprise, the Prius seemed to develop software issues with the brakes. How discouraging!

This is really testing the limits of my Net Promoter instincts. Promoters, by definition, are tolerant of missteps by manufacturers to whom they are loyal. They give manufactures a lot of latitude and expect (or pray) that defects are anomalies that will be resolved and fixed. As a long time Toyota owner, that’s what I’m doing.

A report by Reuters indicates that Toyota Canada has ramped up its advertising spending, but the ads are aimed at its existing customers, rather than at new ones. A company spokesperson says that the future is in the hands of customers driving the cars today, not some potential customers. Toyota seems to understand the importance of their Promoters and wants to keep them that way. OK, Mr. Toyoda, I’m waiting to be convinced that all is good in Toyota Land. I’ve got to get a new car and soon. As a Promoter, I’ll give you my business, but you’ve got to give me back my peace of mind.

In the meantime, I’m going to check out the new Hyundai Tucson. Maybe even take it for a test drive. I don’t think I’m going to like this one bit!

 

Keith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

Net Promoter Score™ is an effective and efficient process to measure the health of your customer relationship. Used correctly, Net Promoter Score can be the driver of superior business performance.  But how is the other team doing?  What is the health of your competitors’ customer relationships?

Business is a very competitive “sport”. Like any pro sports team, businesses are constantly striving to find the competitive edge that will move the ball forward, put the puck in the net, or drop another basket. Pro sports teams have professional scouts checking on the competition throughout the season. They look for weaknesses in the competitive teams that can be exploited for the benefit of their own team. In business we don’t have scouts, but we do have processes like Net Promoter Score that can identify the strengths and weaknesses of the competition. This will help generate customer acquisition, improve retention, grow market share and drive bottom line profits. In short, Net Promoter Score can help you hit the ball out of the park. Just take a look at Apple, a company dedicated to Net Promoter Score that also hits a lot of home runs.

Using Net Promoter Score will identify how many of your customers are Promoters and how many are Detractors. But, do you know how many Promoters your competitor has? How likely are your competitor’s customers to recommend? What are the NPS® verbatim responses telling you about your competitor’s organization, structure and service delivery? Remember that your Detractors will tell you how to fix your business. Consider how much competitive intelligence you’ll get by listening to your competitor’s Detractors. You might just find that golden nugget of information that can turn the game in your favor.

Dig a little deeper into your competitor’s Net Promoter Score. Break it down by geography, demographics, or user segments. You may find that your competitor looks strong on the surface, but analyzing their Net Promoter Score could expose a weak underbelly that you can take advantage of.  Just imagine what you could do if you discovered that your key competitor has a very high number of Detractors on the west coast who are female, under the age of 35 years, single, university educated and hate  their current service provider’s customer service. Perhaps your competitor’s customers on the east coast are less likely to recommend the longer they use their product or service. With this kind of scouting information, you’d be able to call the play that drives right through the defensive line and scores a touchdown. You’d be the hero.

Gathering a competitive Net Promoter Score can be accomplished using telephone or online data collection methodologies. It’s all legal and above board and part of a good competitive intelligence program.  Finding the competitor’s customers might the toughest part of the project. Data collection companies can source customer contact information using a huge array of brokered lists and online panels, but working with a qualified data collection company is critical to ensure the data collected is valid and trustworthy. Do not depend on your own field team or sales force to provide competitive NPS information since you need data that is unbiased and unfiltered.

Still not convinced that you need to track your competitor’s Net Promoter Score? Well, what if they are tracking your score? What would they uncover by listening to your Detractors and how would they exploit this information?  Ever wonder how the competition comes up with that new product, unique service or killer application?  Maybe they did a little scouting on your customers and found a hole in your defense.

Remember! The best defense is a strong offense. Use Net Promoter Score as your strongest offensive strategy.

 

 

Keith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

If you’re a homeowner you probably understand the concept of spending to save money. You’re encouraged by many levels of government to invest in new energy efficient windows, furnaces and water heaters to save money on your monthly fuel bill. If you own a car, you can trade in your old clunker and invest in a new energy efficient hybrid to save on gas over the next five years. The overall message is to invest today to save money tomorrow.

The message for Net Promoter® is the same. Invest in an integrated Net Promoter program today to reduce your costs and save money down the road. I know we’re in a brutal recession and funds are scare, but investing to measure customer loyalty and save money is still a viable fiscal strategy. And, it delivers a very positive ROI. CFOs and accountants like positive ROIs.

So, let’s have a look at how Net Promoter can reduce your costs:

Promoters recommend. When they recommend, they help you acquire new customers at a very low acquisition cost. This reduces costs and makes your acquisition budget go further. As a bonus, referred customers (according to SatMetrix® research data) have fewer problems and complaints which reduces your administration costs. Another cost savings in the bag.

Promoters stay longer, use more of your product or services and they complain less. Over the long term, they generate more profit and cost less in maintenance costs. The acquisition costs can be amortized over a longer period, increasing the ROI on Promoters. This will make your accountant smile.

Promoters rarely take legal action (again, according to the SatMetrix® data). They like your company so why would they take you to court? Promoters are not likely to generate expensive lawsuits. This will make your legal department smile.

Promoters are a forgiving bunch and will overlook the minor transgressions that eventually befall all companies at some point. Promoters will forgive you when your company suffers a public embarrassment so that the need for an expensive Public Relations defensive smoke screen is lessened. Just don’t take them for granted. They will not forgive you forever.

Because Promoters are experienced customers, their demand curve is smoother and reduces the need for inventories to cover the peaks and valleys of unpredictable demand. Reduced inventories translate into reduced costs. This will make your CEO smile.

Finally, Promoters are nicer people to deal with. They like nearly everything about your company’s products and services so they treat your front line staff with respect and decency. Happy Promoters create happy employees. Happy employees are more productive employees and that means profits. This will make everyone in your company smile.

We’ve all heard that old chestnut. “You gotta’ spend money to make money”. Well, spending on a Net Promoter® program will make money and companies like Apple, ebay, Enterprise and Harley Davidson have proven that it works. They’re all smiling.

So, invest in a Net Promoter program and reduce your costs. It will bring a smile to your face.

 

Keith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

In my previous blog I offered some advice on the implementation of a Net Promoter Score® program within your organization. That blog created some further discussion as to which methodology is the best for NPS® data collection – telephone, online or a combination of both. The answer?

It depends.

Online data collection offers speed, efficiency, broad reach and (sometimes) lower costs. Online would be appropriate if you have a current, qualified customer contact list. If you do not have a list of your current customers or competitive customers, you’ll need to acquire a list from a panel provider who will supply profiled email addresses from commercially available list brokers. The participation (or response rate) varies greatly depending on the quality of the list, the relationship with the respondent and the list source. Client provided lists may get a response as high as 40% while a purchased list that is poorly profile may be well under 5%. Considering that the overall cost is relevant to the participation rates, online data collection may not always be the lowest cost alternative.

Since online surveys are self administered, they are also self-selected. The respondent decides if they want to complete the questionnaire, creating a sample bias. There are many potential respondents who never make the email list because they are not readily accessible or they do not have an email account. This is another source of sample bias which shows that online data collection, which has its advantages, is not truly representative of the target profile. Too many potential respondents fall through the cracks.

 

Telephone data collection (CATI) has been around for decades and is still a widely used methodology for research data collection. While many complain that it is intrusive and an invasion of privacy, the truth is that telephone data collection is a viable option for NPS. The greatest advantage of telephone is the human element – the personal contact. For a NPS relationship-type study, a telephone interview conducted by a skilled, well trained interviewer can be a very positive experience for both the sponsor client and the respondent. This is especially true when conducting NPS studies with B2B respondents, senior executives and high value customers. The interviewer becomes a representative of the company. You’re not going to get that with online data collection.

Nothing beats telephone to get directly to the voice of the customer. There is a proactive element of the personal interaction of a telephone interview that generates a high level of information. We’ve understood this for quite a while and have developed a new service called Question-Based Digital Voice Recordings (QB-DVR). This allows us to record each and every telephone interview and play them back at the question level. This is a unique and effective tool to hear the actual discussion behind the quantitative data. Now you can hear the actual voice of the Promoters and the Detractors.

 

Your immediate reaction might be that telephone date collection is far more expensive than online. Our experience has shown that a well executed, brief NPS telephone questionnaire 3 to 5 minutes in length and using a qualified client provided list can be just as cost effective as an online study. The time and effort required for the programming and hosting the online questionnaire as well as the lower response/participation rates may. in fact, result in a completed online questionnaire similar in cost to a telephone interview.

What about those occasions when the target respondents cannot be reached by email? If you are committed to an online format then you’re out of options, but if you are working with a data collection partner that does both telephone and online you have a viable solution. With the proper configurations and training, a skilled telephone interviewer is able to contact the respondent, qualify them, acquire their email address and then immediately send them a link to an online questionnaire. This works well with senior execs and high value financial customers where confidentiality is an issue.

So, you do have several options when it comes to collecting NPS data – telephone, online or a combination of both. The methodology you select really depends on the situation and the research objectives. Just be cautious that you don’t blindly select online data collection without considering all the options. Think about it and do it right the first time.

eith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

 

You’ve bought the book “The Ultimate Question” by Fred Reichheld, visited the websites, read the blogs (maybe even mine) and downloaded the white papers. You’re convinced Net Promoter Score® and customer loyalty tracking will work for your company, but how do you begin?

You’re not alone in feeling a bit overwhelmed. Just this week, while attending seminar on customer loyalty, I met the marketing manager of a regional insurance company who was convinced her company needed an NPS®implementation. She told me that the company was interested in NPS but they didn’t know how to get started. This gave me a chance to explain my 5 step approach to implementing a Net Promoter Score® program that I’ve dubbed “The Five A’s to Net Promoter Score®”. Or, if you’re Canadian like me, you might call it “The 5 Eh’s to Net Promoter Score®. (That’s a bit of regional humour/humor, folks.)

The five steps are Align, Aim, Ask, Analyze and Act. Here’s how they work:

Step 1 – Align

Make sure that you company is aligned and ready for an NPS program. This starts at the Executive Offices, flows through all levels of middle management and finishes up on the factory or salesroom floor. You’ll need buy-in from all levels of the company, especially if the NPS results are integrated into employee performance metrics. People tend to act differently when money is involved.

Don’t assume that everyone is aligned and stays aligned. Constant communications will be needed throughout the program. You’ll need management and operational commitment at the beginning, middle and end of the process. Create an obsession for NPS and create an obsession for the customer.

Step 2 – Aim

Establish exactly who it is you are targeting. Do this by demographics, behaviors, attitudes, segment or what ever criteria make sense for your business. But, once you’ve identified the target, keep your eye on the target and be consistent. Don’t let your attention wander.

Net Promoter Score is about tracking and improvement of your loyalty measurement, so you’ll need to determine where you are and where you want to be. What is your NPS today and where do you aim to be 3, 6 or 12 months from now?

You’ll probably want to identify measure and track several key attributes of your business that have a direct impact on loyalty, eg. product performance, service, value, cleanliness, friendliness etc. These attributes need to be meaningful and actionable. Set benchmarks for these attributes and then measure and communicate the results. This is how you’ll make operational improvements.

 

Step 3 – Ask

The old adage “Garbage in, garbage out” is very true for a NPS program. The quality of the data is only as good as the quality of the data collection process.

So, ask the right questions. Ask the right customer. Ask at the right time. Ask using the right research methodology. Most importantly, think before you ask. Spend a bit of time thinking through the strategy of asking before making the leap.

If you’re not sure how to ask correctly, ask from some help from an experienced Net Promoter® Partner. Find a partner you can trust who understands NPS and can advise you how to ask correctly.

Step 4 – Analyze

What get measured gets done, and what gets analyzed gets implemented. You’ll end up with some very powerful data when you implement an NPS® program, but it will have very little value unless it is analyzed and acted upon.

The ups and downs of the Net Promoter Score™ indicate the health of your customer relationship. You’ll need to analyze the key attribute ratings and the open-ended responses to identify what structural and/or operational changes will need to be implemented.

Remember that Promoters will tell you the great things you do and how to acquire more customers while Detractors identify those areas that need to be fixed that cost the company money. A little concerted data analysis will soon show you the light.

Step 5 – Act

This could be the hardest step of all. Now, you’ll have to make something happen based on all this knowledge that you’ve acquired. This starts will consistent communications of the NPS results – the good, the bad and the ugly. If the company is aligned from the very beginning, there will be a built-in expectation of regular NPS updates, so don’t disappoint your peers of management.

Promoters and Detractors are talking to you – screaming in some cases – so listen, learn and act. Your Promoters will tell how to improve your marketing message, product offering and benefits statements. Do this and you profits can increase. Detractors, maybe your best friends in this process, will tell you what needs to be fixed. Do this, and you can stop the financial bleeding. Either way, you win.

Communicate the learnings form the NPS process. Use the information to drive change and innovation. Celebrate your successes. Then repeat on a regular basis.

eith Chapin is a Certified Net Promoter® Associate and Consultant with over 35 years of experience in research, marketing and customer insights. He can be reached at kchapin@promotersrecommend.com

Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.